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11th March, 20215 min read

Do natural remedies for premature ejaculation work?

Medical reviewer:Dr Adiele Hoffman
Author:Caroline Bodian
Last reviewed: 10/03/2021
Medically reviewed

All of Healthily's articles undergo medical safety checks to verify that the information is medically safe. View more details in our safety page, or read our editorial policy.

Are you concerned that you come (ejaculate) too quickly, either before or during sex? You’re not alone: premature ejaculation is a common problem.

It can be associated with several mental and physical factors, from stress, performance anxiety or depression to prostate or thyroid problems.

Thankfully, there are ways to treat it, including things you can do at home as well as therapy or medication. Some people may want to explore natural remedies, such as herbal or homeopathic medicine for premature ejaculation.

But is there a natural cure for premature ejaculation? And what else can you try? Read on to find out.

Ayurvedic medicine

Some people believe Ayurvedic herbal medicine can be a premature ejaculation treatment. This traditional medicine system comes from India and is more than 3,000 years old.

In India, people who practice Ayurvedic medicine have passed state-recognised training, but this isn’t always the case in other countries.

According to Ayurveda, herb and plant-based medicines for premature ejaculation include yauvanamrit vati, kaunch beej and kamini vidrawan ras, which can be taken as capsules with a glass of water.

However, many Ayurvedic medicines haven’t been scientifically studied. One small 2013 study in India did find that men who used Ayurvedic medicine saw an increase in the time it took them to ejaculate during sex. But this evidence is limited, and more research into both effectiveness and safety is needed.

Remember that herbal medicines can have an effect on your body, just like conventional medicines, and should be used with caution. They can cause reactions or side effects and may interfere with other medication, and they’re not always regulated to the same standards as other medicines.

With this in mind, it’s best to speak to your doctor for advice if you want to try Ayurvedic medicine for premature ejaculation.

Zinc and magnesium

Some research has looked at the role the minerals zinc and magnesium play in sex function.

Zinc helps your body make the sex hormone testosterone. Some research found a link between zinc deficiency and male sexual dysfunction, while a study in rats showed that zinc supplements can increase testosterone levels. So it may be worth trying a zinc supplement to help with premature ejaculation.

Magnesium may also be involved in sexual health, and some studies have suggested it could play a role in premature ejaculation. But again, the science is inconclusive and more research is needed.

If you want to try a supplement, remember that taking too much zinc or magnesium can cause side effects, such as diarrhoea, stomach cramps and vomiting – so don’t take more than the recommended daily dose.

It’s generally better to get minerals from your diet – both zinc and magnesium are found in meat, leafy green vegetables and wholegrain cereals.

Dietary changes

Despite the research into zinc and magnesium mentioned above, there’s no proven link between diet and premature ejaculation. However, eating a healthy, balanced diet can improve your overall health, including your sexual health.

Plus, being very overweight (obese) is thought to be a risk factor for premature ejaculation, and sticking to a healthy diet is important if you want to lose weight.

Other things to try at home

While the evidence for natural remedies is limited, there are other things you can try at home before you speak to your doctor. You may find it helpful to:

  • use a thick condom to decrease feeling during sex
  • masturbate an hour or 2 before sex
  • take breaks during sex and imagine something boring
  • have sex with your partner on top, so they can pull away when you’re close to ejaculation
  • take a deep breath to briefly stop the ‘ejaculatory reflex’ when you feel you’re about to ejaculate

There are also behavioural techniques you can try with your partner, which can help you ‘unlearn’ premature ejaculation. Called the ‘stop-start’ and ‘squeeze’ techniques, both involve stopping and starting sexual stimulation.

You can find out more about these techniques here, but as they need practice to get right, it may be better to learn them at couples therapy, which you doctor may be able to refer you for (see below).

When should I see a doctor?

If you’ve been worried about premature ejaculation for some time, it’s a good idea to speak to your doctor. They will be able to examine you and suggest treatment or refer you to a specialist if necessary.

As well as the couples therapy and techniques mentioned above, other treatment options include antidepressants and anaesthetics you apply to your penis to decrease sensation during sex.

Key points

  • premature ejaculation, or coming too soon, is a common condition with various causes
  • some people believe Ayurvedic herbal medicines can help, but there’s little scientific evidence to support their effectiveness or safety
  • it’s best to speak to your doctor before trying any herbal medicines
  • some studies suggest zinc and magnesium may play a role premature in ejaculation
  • there are several other things you can try at home to help
  • see your doctor if you’re worried about premature ejaculation
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